Overcoming Your Fear of Flying by Scott Beale

The fear of flying is relatively common, but it can prevent people from traveling to see the world or for business. Overcoming that fear takes some time and effort, but it opens up a huge number of opportunities. It is worth the effort for most people, and there are a few different ways to get started.

Exposure & Professional Support 

To read the full blog and learn more about exposure and professional support, please visit my website: ScottBealeAviation.net.

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Did You Know This About Air Force One?

Most Americans are familiar with Air Force One. It’s the big jet that the President uses for all his air travel. Many folks probably don’t give it much thought, preferring perhaps to focus on where the President is going and what he will be doing rather than the aircraft itself.

Air Force One, however, has a storied history and many interesting facts. Many of these points of interest were recently discussed in a Robb Report article. Here are a few of them:

Is there only one Air Force One?

At the present, two aircraft serve as Air Force One. Each one is a Boeing VC-25. In fact, Air Force One is a call-sign, not an aircraft. Any well-maintained aircraft can serve as Air Force One.

 

To read the full blog and learn more interesting facts about Air Force One, please visit my website: ScottBealeAviation.com

 

Flying Is the Safest It’s Ever Been

Thanks to advances in technology and new regulations, flying is safer than it has ever been. Numbers show that last year was the safest year for commercial passenger air-travel in recorded history, even though more flights are being taken now more than ever before.

To read the full blog, please visit my website: ScottBealeAviation.net

6 Surprising Facts of Flying

More than 8 million people travel via plane each day. While most people are familiar with the concept of flying, there are several facts associated with this modern method of transportation that often go unnoticed.

1. Flight Attendants Are Paid Only When the Plane Is Moving

While different airlines have their own policy, most only pay their flight attendants when the plane is moving. If it takes an hour for all passengers to board, that’s an hour of unpaid time for the flight attendants. They are generally only paid when the plane is taking off, flying or landing. As a result, many flight attendants complain about flight delays or other issues preventing the plane from moving.

2. Flying Causes Dehydration

Many air travelers feel thirsty upon boarding a plane because of the cabin’s low humidity. According to the World Health Organization (WHO), the average humidity inside a plane’s cabin is less than 20 percent. To put that number into perspective, most homes have a humidity level of 30 percent to 50 percent. With less moisture vapor in the air, passengers often experience the effects of mild dehydration, including dry mouth, fatigue and itchy skin.

3. All Planes Have Ashtrays But Smoking Is Prohibited

It may sound contradictory, but the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) requires all flights in and out of the United States to have an ashtray in the lavatory even though smoking is prohibited. CNN explains that ashtrays provide a safe way for passengers to extinguish their cigarette if they decide to light up even if smoking is prohibited.

To read the next three surprising facts, please visit my website: ScottBealeAviation.com

A Glossary for Aviation Jargon: Part III

If you’ve read my first two blogs on airline jargon, you now know twenty new terms! This is my last segment for the airline glossary, provided nine more words, to make you an expert the next time you travel through an airport. Thanks to Patrick Smith, and his book the Cockpit Confidential, here are the last few terms in this series.

LAST MINUTE PAPERWORK
If you’ve ever been on a flight that seemed to have taken forever to leave the terminal, you were probably waiting on “last minute paperwork.” This is typically for a revision to the flight plan or waiting on the maintenance team to get the logbook in order.

NONSTOP
In the first of this series, we discussed what was a direct flight. Go back and re-read that definition. A nonstop flight is a flight that does not have any stops between take-off and landing at your destination.

THE OFF-POSITION
When the flight attendants are asking you to put your electronics in the “off-position,” they are simply just telling you to turn it off.

Continue reading “A Glossary for Aviation Jargon: Part III”

A Glossary for Aviation Jargon: Part II

Last month I wrote a blog about popular airline jargon and the various definitions. This month, I’m going to continue that trend and teach you eight new words. With the help of Patrick Smith, and his book the Cockpit Confidential, here are the next few terms in this series.

FINAL APPROACH
Pilots and flight attendants have slightly different meanings to the term “final approach.” According to the pilot, the final approach is when the airplane is on its last straight segment of the landing pattern. Simply put, the plane is aligned with the center of the runway for landing. If you were to ask a flight attendant the meaning of “final approach,” they may tell you it’s the last portion of the descent.

FIRST OFFICER (COPILOT)
As outlined in my past blog, the copilot and the captain are both well equipped and know how to fly the plane. However, the first officer, often referred to as the copilot, sits to the right and is second in command. The first officer will alternate shifts with the captain in the event of a long flight where the captain will need to take a break.

FLIGHT DECK
The flight-deck is another term for the cockpit, where the pilots sit.

Continue reading “A Glossary for Aviation Jargon: Part II”