Six Interesting Facts About Flying

Scott Beale Aviation shares interesting and lesser-known facts about flying.

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Nearly 4 billion passengers boarded planes across all global airlines in 2017, and that number shows signs of increasing as the years continue to progress. Despite so many passengers frequently flying across various airlines, there are many things individuals don’t know about flying. Here are six interesting facts about flying that explain why passengers experience dry eyes, mood swings, and more while traveling on planes.

Taste is Reduced During Flights

While airplane food may appear inherently unappetizing, it’s mostly rendered unappealing due to altitude. When it comes to traveling via airplanes, cabin pressure can reduce taste by as much as 30 percent. With about a third of taste buds numbed, it’s no surprise food eaten on airplanes tastes bland. Interestingly, altitude also tends to enhance savory flavors, making tomato juice so much more appealing.

Cabin Air is as Dry as a Desert

Humidity in a home is, on average, over 30 percent. A plane’s pressurized cabin keeps humidity low, typically less than 20 percent, which is about the average humidity of the Sahara Desert. While low humidity doesn’t present any health risks, passengers are advised to wear eyeglasses to prevent dry contact lenses and discomfort, use moisturizing lotions, and limit consumption of alcohol and caffeine on long flights to avoid internal dehydration.

Turbulence Typically Drops a Plane Only a Few Feet

While turbulence may be jarring to passengers, traditional, run-of-the-mill turbulence typically only drops a few feet in altitude. Moderate turbulence can drop a plane between 10 and 20 feet, whereas severe turbulence has the potential to move a plane 100 feet.

During a Crash, the Tail is the Safest Place

When it comes to choosing seats, the last seats prove the safest. While plane crashes are rare, according to a Popular Mechanics study, passengers who sit near the tail of a plane are about 40 percent more likely to survive a crash than those seated in the first few rows of the plane.

Planes Can Still Operate With Only One Engine

While failed engines are unsettling, commercial jets are actually able to fly with only one operable engine. They are also able to land safely without any engine power.

Traveling By Plane Can Influence Moods

Many passengers admit to feeling emotional when traveling by plane. According to a 1988 study, decreased oxygen and mild hypoxia caused by altitude influences moods. This can cause individuals to experience depressive episodes, become irritable, anxious, and apathetic.

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Scott Beale has been working in the aviation industry for more than two decades, successfully growing founded and acquired businesses. For similar reads, visit this blog.

Is The Blended Wing Body The Future Of Aircraft Design?

First developed a few decades ago, the Blended Wing Body or BWB is a hybrid aircraft design that makes a plane look like a manta ray. The design was then strictly used for military applications, but NASA and its affiliates are now keen on further studying its potential for use in commercial flight.

The BWB concept is seen to offer certain advantages over conventional tube and wing airframes. Firstly, it combines high-lift wing with an airfoil-shaped body. This would allow aircraft to generate more lift while minimizing drag. The shape likewise offers significantly decreased fuel consumption even with a bigger cargo or passenger capacity in the middle of the aircraft’s body.

                           Image source: researchgate.net

During the 1940s, the original BWB concept was used in the B-2 Bomber and the YB-49 military planes. These aircrafts had lighter and stronger metal frames and control surfaces on the trailing edge, following the same design principle as the current BWB which does away with the conventional tail assembly.

NASA believes that BWB can be used in large commercial planes. The configuration of the plane is efficient and would eat up 20 percent less fuel than most modern planes. Though BWB planes will have a slightly wider wingspan than a Boeing 747, they can operate in most airports in the U.S. These new planes are likewise seen to cost less to operate, weigh less, and generate less emissions and noise.

                                        Image source: dezeen.com

Scott Beale has been working in the aviation industry for more than two decades, successfully growing businesses, both which he acquired and founded. Through the years, he has developed competencies in account development and acquisitions, strategic and tactical planning, operational execution, and contract negotiations among others. For similar reads, visit this blog.

What are the advantages of a blended wing body aircraft?

For the longest time, commercial airlines have used the same tube and wing design. Regardless of how many engines or even size, the main design is still the same. There is one design which may be applicable for commercial use, the blended wing body design.

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                                                          Image source: nasa.gov

A blended wing body or a BWB aircraft has a hybrid shape that resembles a flying wing but also incorporates some features from commercial planes. Its airframe merges efficient high-lift wings with a wide airfoil-shaped body. This allows for the entire aircraft to generate lift instead of just the wings. By minimizing drag, this shape will help fuel economy while creating more areas for cargo and passengers alike.

The blended wing body design isn’t anything new. In fact, it was designed decades ago, and certain planes have already incorporated the design. The famous BWB plane has to be the B-2 bomber and the YB-49. The YB-49 was developed in the 1940s and used composite materials that are stronger and lighter compared to conventional metal planes. BWB planes are also known for having several control surfaces on the trailing edge as demonstrated by the B-2.

If a commercial airline decides to make use of a BWB design, it would truly be revolutionary. Ticket prices may go down with the savings on jet fuel, more people could be accommodated, and the new design could create unique interior designs never seen before.

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                                             Image source: nasa.gov

Scott Beale is an aviation and aerospace professional with more than 20 years of leadership experience. For more reads on the aviation field, visit this blog.

The Hidden Meanings Inside Your Flight Number

Scott Beale Aviation The Hidden Meanings Inside Your Flight Number

Anyone who has ever taken a flight, international or domestic, knows that the number on your ticket is the key to everything. It tells you where to go, it helps you find your flight on the departures and arrivals board, and it is one of the main ways that you keep track of yourself and your luggage at the airport.

But have you ever wondered what that string of numbers and letters really mean, and what else they can do for you? Let’s take a look and find out.

The Significance of the Letters

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Reasons Why Drones Will Not Fly as Solo Fighter Aces Any Time Soon

Scott Beale Aviation Reasons Why Drones Will Not Fly as Solo Fighter Aces Any Time SoonVisions of a war fought with robotic soldiers and unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs), or a drone, has been for decades, deemed the fodder for science fiction lore. However, the military capabilities of drone aircraft have taken aviation warfare into a new Sci-Fi age. Does this mean the next great fighter ace will be a drone? Not necessarily.

Reaction Time

The landscape of ground warfare changes slowly. However, the environment surrounding air assaults can be altered in an instant. There is an inherent delay in communications, if ever so slight, between ground control and a drone. With reaction time being so vital real time success in air combat, humans are still critical to the success of these missions.

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Feeling Tired After a Long Flight? Here’s Why

Scott Beale Aviation Feeling Tired After a Long Flight? Here's Why

People who fly will notice that once they land, they feel incredibly tired and lethargic. This happens even if the flight was long enough to have a nap. Have you ever wondered why flying makes you feel tired? There could be several factors at play.

Reduced Humidity
The air that is circulated into the airplane cabin is brought in from the outside atmosphere. The air that exists so high in the atmosphere is surprisingly void of moisture which means that the air you breathe during a long flight is dry. Dry air can cause you to develop dehydration. Dehydration causes lethargy and tiredness because it means that your blood volume has been reduced and isn’t providing necessary oxygen to your muscles and organs. The best way to combat this type of exhaustion is to drink plenty of water while in flight.

Continue reading “Feeling Tired After a Long Flight? Here’s Why”

Overcoming Your Fear of Flying by Scott Beale

The fear of flying is relatively common, but it can prevent people from traveling to see the world or for business. Overcoming that fear takes some time and effort, but it opens up a huge number of opportunities. It is worth the effort for most people, and there are a few different ways to get started.

Exposure & Professional Support 

To read the full blog and learn more about exposure and professional support, please visit my website: ScottBealeAviation.net.