Interesting facts about the aerospace and defense industry

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Image source: Birmingham.ac.uk

A lot of Americans are vaguely familiar with the name “aerospace and defense” probably because they hear it on occasion in the news.  However, to paint a clearer picture, here are some notable facts about the industry.

  • The aerospace and defense industry can be divided into the two industries in its name. The aerospace half involves the production and sale of commercial aircraft, while the defense side assembles systems (and weaponry) for land, sea, and air military operations.
  • Some of the projects of the aerospace industry aside from aircraft are missiles and space vehicles. The industry also develops and produces subsystems such as propulsion and key support systems, and equipment for flight simulations.
  • Relatively few countries have an aerospace and defense industry since it eats up a substantial portion of the economy. However, governments have been quick to justify the cost, citing the overall political value of the industry both domestically and globally.
  • The United States military is the single largest market for defense systems in the world. Not only does it purchase aerospace and defense systems for America, it also supplies equipment for its allies all over the world.
  • The many space exploration programs, such as a manned mission to Mars, keep the aerospace industry busy.
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Image source: SanDiegoBusiness.org

Scott Beale has led various aviation firms in attaining growth in revenues with his competencies in strategic and tactical planning, account development and acquisition, government contract and management, sales team training and supervision, and financial reporting.  More reads on aviation here.

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6 Surprising Facts of Flying

More than 8 million people travel via plane each day. While most people are familiar with the concept of flying, there are several facts associated with this modern method of transportation that often go unnoticed.

1. Flight Attendants Are Paid Only When the Plane Is Moving

While different airlines have their own policy, most only pay their flight attendants when the plane is moving. If it takes an hour for all passengers to board, that’s an hour of unpaid time for the flight attendants. They are generally only paid when the plane is taking off, flying or landing. As a result, many flight attendants complain about flight delays or other issues preventing the plane from moving.

2. Flying Causes Dehydration

Many air travelers feel thirsty upon boarding a plane because of the cabin’s low humidity. According to the World Health Organization (WHO), the average humidity inside a plane’s cabin is less than 20 percent. To put that number into perspective, most homes have a humidity level of 30 percent to 50 percent. With less moisture vapor in the air, passengers often experience the effects of mild dehydration, including dry mouth, fatigue and itchy skin.

3. All Planes Have Ashtrays But Smoking Is Prohibited

It may sound contradictory, but the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) requires all flights in and out of the United States to have an ashtray in the lavatory even though smoking is prohibited. CNN explains that ashtrays provide a safe way for passengers to extinguish their cigarette if they decide to light up even if smoking is prohibited.

To read the next three surprising facts, please visit my website: ScottBealeAviation.com