What lies ahead for drone technology

2019 is seen by many industry experts as the year drones become more widely accepted. Though the technology has been around for quite a while, drones have yet to be fully embraced, says aviation expert Scott Beale. But more and more startups and established companies are beginning to commit to the flight of drones.

Image source: roboticsbusinessreview.com

For one, the programming needed is catching up with the technology, even as more innovative businesses are showing bigger businesses how the application can be maximized. From the incorporation of more robust AI to spectrum analysis apps, new platforms are coming out in support of the needed software to further drive drone technology and harness its potential.

While drone technology is certainly disruptive, it is starting to infiltrate more industries. It shouldn’t take long before larger organizations flex their proverbial muscles and take advantage of their bigger investment clout. And this will manifest itself in more challenging e-commerce programs as the 2020s near.

Image source: translatemedia.com

Practical applications of drone technology in shipping and delivery is already in the works. Amazon was recently just given legal permission to use drones for carrying packages below 400 feet and weighing up to 1.5 pounds. In agriculture, drones will prove crucial for mapping 3D images of fields for soil analysis, as well as for spraying crops and determining their relative health and density, adds Scott Beale.

Scott Beale has been working in the aviation industry for more than 20 years, successfully growing businesses which he both acquired and founded. He has led various aviation firms in attaining revenue growth. More on Scott and his work here.

Ways drone technology will affect the future

Unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) or drones have been around for quite some time, but only in recent years have they become commercially available. But they have quickly become a part of many people’s everyday lives, and soon drones will become a staple the world over, says aviation expert Scott Beale. Below is how drone technology will affect lives in the 2020s.

Image source: inc.com

Studies conducted by the FAA forecast that drones will reach as much as 7 million by next year. These UAVs will rule the skies, with 2.7 million of the said number being made commercially available. This is a staggering amount, given that there are only between 26,600 and 39,000 planes on the planet today.

By 2024, the worldwide commercial drone market is seen to reach 17 billion, a huge leap from its current photography and video application. This is because drones will find increased use in various other industries such as construction, real estate, and agriculture. In this sense, many job opportunities will shift from labor-intensive ones to more analytical work.

Image source: mining-technology.com

It must be mentioned that while drones are still associated with military use, this will change drastically this coming decade. Moreover, drones will not necessarily be used for delivery purposes, with less than one percent of commercial drones predicted to service the shipping industry. Most importantly, future drones will be able to help to save lives and reduce accidents by eradicating mundane work like roof inspections, adds Scott Beale.

Scott Beale was the CEO, President, and founder of Flightworks, Inc. He was responsible for expanding FlightWorks from a $1.5-million-dollar business when he purchased it in 2000 to a $90-million enterprise when he sold the business in 2010. More on Mr. Beale’s work and career here.

Reasons Why Drones Will Not Fly as Solo Fighter Aces Any Time Soon

Scott Beale Aviation Reasons Why Drones Will Not Fly as Solo Fighter Aces Any Time SoonVisions of a war fought with robotic soldiers and unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs), or a drone, has been for decades, deemed the fodder for science fiction lore. However, the military capabilities of drone aircraft have taken aviation warfare into a new Sci-Fi age. Does this mean the next great fighter ace will be a drone? Not necessarily.

Reaction Time

The landscape of ground warfare changes slowly. However, the environment surrounding air assaults can be altered in an instant. There is an inherent delay in communications, if ever so slight, between ground control and a drone. With reaction time being so vital real time success in air combat, humans are still critical to the success of these missions.

Continue reading “Reasons Why Drones Will Not Fly as Solo Fighter Aces Any Time Soon”