Is The Blended Wing Body The Future Of Aircraft Design?

First developed a few decades ago, the Blended Wing Body or BWB is a hybrid aircraft design that makes a plane look like a manta ray. The design was then strictly used for military applications, but NASA and its affiliates are now keen on further studying its potential for use in commercial flight.

The BWB concept is seen to offer certain advantages over conventional tube and wing airframes. Firstly, it combines high-lift wing with an airfoil-shaped body. This would allow aircraft to generate more lift while minimizing drag. The shape likewise offers significantly decreased fuel consumption even with a bigger cargo or passenger capacity in the middle of the aircraft’s body.

                           Image source: researchgate.net

During the 1940s, the original BWB concept was used in the B-2 Bomber and the YB-49 military planes. These aircrafts had lighter and stronger metal frames and control surfaces on the trailing edge, following the same design principle as the current BWB which does away with the conventional tail assembly.

NASA believes that BWB can be used in large commercial planes. The configuration of the plane is efficient and would eat up 20 percent less fuel than most modern planes. Though BWB planes will have a slightly wider wingspan than a Boeing 747, they can operate in most airports in the U.S. These new planes are likewise seen to cost less to operate, weigh less, and generate less emissions and noise.

                                        Image source: dezeen.com

Scott Beale has been working in the aviation industry for more than two decades, successfully growing businesses, both which he acquired and founded. Through the years, he has developed competencies in account development and acquisitions, strategic and tactical planning, operational execution, and contract negotiations among others. For similar reads, visit this blog.

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