How does one prepare for flight school?

One of the more interesting parts of an already interesting aviation industry is flying a plane. However, Scott Beale notes that going through flight school isn’t simple or easy. Like many worthy endeavors in life, one has to put in a lot of work and dedication to earn his wings.

Image source: usaeroflight.net

Here are a few things aspiring pilots need to prepare for before heading to flight school.

Finances

Flight school doesn’t come cheap. It’s like going to college. And without enough savings, aspiring pilots may need to pull out a loan just to pay for the training expenses.

Schedules

A huge number of people who enter flight school have something else going on in their lives. Many of them have jobs. Before entering flight school, aspiring pilots need to check and re-check if they have time to do everything they need to do and go to flight school.

School

There are hundreds of flight schools all over the country. Aspiring pilots should choose one that’s reputable and accessible, and has the proper accreditation.

Image source: atpflightschool.com

Instructor

Not all flight instructors are the same. Some are stricter, while others are more easygoing. Aspiring pilots should choose their instructors according to their own preferences and under which type of mentor they think they will have a better chance of learning and absorbing information.

Would you want to enroll in flight school? Share your thoughts with Scott Beale in the comments below.

Aviation and aerospace professional Scott Beale is responsible for piloting the successful business turnaround of Aerodynamics Inc. As its CEO from 2011 to 2015, Scott helped increase the company’s profitability with new business initiatives and diversification efforts. Visit this blog for more posts on aviation.

Some important tips for student pilots

Learning how to fly a plane is surely one of the most rewarding experiences you’ll have in your lifetime, however initially daunting it may be and despite the many concepts and practical knowledge to master. Hereunder are some key tips to boost your confidence from behind the cockpit and get you that coveted student pilot license, courtesy of aviation professional Scott Beale.

Image source: boldmethod.com

First, immerse yourself in everything related to aviation. Hang out at the airport and talk to pilots, tower controllers, and aircraft mechanics. Listen intently to their advice. Also, make it a habit to listen to tower frequencies whenever you are flight-planning.

Remember that even without your intervention, the plane will fly. When you’re with your instructor high in the clouds, try relaxing and letting everything go whenever you find yourself too eager to jerk the controls to fly level and straight. Notice, too, that during flight, the view gets smaller when you pull back and bigger when you push forward.

Image source: simforums.com

Always carry sic-sacs with you. Even if you haven’t had an episode of vomiting in previous flights, this doesn’t mean you won’t encounter such stomach-churning moments. Make sure there’s plenty of it for both you and your passengers.

It may sound trivial, but we suggest watching movies like Airplane and Top Gun over and over. The idea is to be able to answer flight questions posed there and complete any technical quotes. Learn to discern which lines are just movie myths and which ones are actual aviation truths. Finally, don’t feel down if you’re having a series of rough landings. Every seasoned pilot knows that he or she will not land perfectly each time, adds Scott Beale.

Ohio State University alumnus Scott Beale is an aviation and aerospace professional who has led various aviation firms in achieving optimum business performance, especially in terms of safety and certification. For more aviation-related reads and insights, subscribe to this Twitter page.

Top facts on air-to-air refueling

While it doesn’t happen as often with commercial airlines, Scott Beale maintains that one of the biggest breakthroughs the aviation industry ever enjoyed is air-to-air refueling. While the concept first emerged in the 1920s, it wasn’t until the 1950s that it was successfully done in an official capacity.

Image source: aviation.stackexchange.com

Today, with the advancement of refueling technology, probe-and-drogue and flying boom systems are the main avenues for air-to-air refueling. The probe-and-drogue system is easier to use, while the flying boom makes air-to-air refueling a lot quicker, albeit with the need of a human operator for the boom.

Air-to-air refueling has been a huge help, especially in long distance flights. And with the technology constantly evolving, larger planes will soon take to the skies to refuel. Currently, the Stratotanker sits at the forefront of air-to-air refueling. However, Boeing has been developing its own refueling plane with a 120,000-pound fuel capacity.

Scott Beale also mentions how air-to-air refueling may in fact be the future of commercial air travel, with a number of airlines already adopting aerial refueling in many of their long distance flights.

Image source: navyrecognition.com

What do you think of air-to-air refueling? Would you choose a flight that requires air-to-air refueling over one that requires you to stop over in another airport? Feel free to share your thoughts with Scott Beale in the comments section below.

Scott Beale is an aviation professional whose expertise in commercial sales and marketing of aviation products, government contracting, FAA certifications, maintenance report operations, and startup operations has led the companies he piloted to achieve revenue growth and various certifications. For related posts on travel and aviation, go to this link.

Airlines need social media engagement to create brand equity

Most global airlines now understand the value of harnessing their social media presence, if they are to engage fliers and build lasting relationships. While this endeavor does mean having more real-time engagements and leaving the comfort zone of the corporate world, it’s nonetheless needed in this digital age for the maintenance and enhancement of brand equity, says aviation expert Scott Beale.

Image source: revenue-hub.com

Still, though many are already locked into some form of social media engagement, some are looking for more innovative campaigns and initiatives. KLM has its “Meet & Seat” service where fliers are allowed to choose seats beside passengers based on similar interests, as indicated in their social media profiles. British Airways, on the other hand, uses a Facebook app called “Perfect Days,” which encouragers travelers to share their itinerary and travel wish list on the social media site.

Image source: chirpify.com

Studies show that, for the world’s leading airlines, the volume of social media communication today ranges between 60,000 and 1 million Facebook followers and 15,000 and 20,000 tweets. And though these numbers are expected to grow even more in the coming decade, there’s still much to be done before airlines can become truly competent in social media engagement and customer relationship management in general. A larger, more robust resource pool is needed to respond to the increasing waves of customer posts and queries and concerns.

Scott Beale adds that a more strategic approach might be most advisable to attain brand equity. One way to do this is for airlines to partner with providers composed of social media professionals who are adept in the new technology platform.

Aviation professional Scott Beale has been working in the aviation industry for over 20 years. He is highly proficient in commercial sales and aviation products marketing, government contracting, and business startups. More on Mr. Beale and his work here.

What lies ahead for drone technology

2019 is seen by many industry experts as the year drones become more widely accepted. Though the technology has been around for quite a while, drones have yet to be fully embraced, says aviation expert Scott Beale. But more and more startups and established companies are beginning to commit to the flight of drones.

Image source: roboticsbusinessreview.com

For one, the programming needed is catching up with the technology, even as more innovative businesses are showing bigger businesses how the application can be maximized. From the incorporation of more robust AI to spectrum analysis apps, new platforms are coming out in support of the needed software to further drive drone technology and harness its potential.

While drone technology is certainly disruptive, it is starting to infiltrate more industries. It shouldn’t take long before larger organizations flex their proverbial muscles and take advantage of their bigger investment clout. And this will manifest itself in more challenging e-commerce programs as the 2020s near.

Image source: translatemedia.com

Practical applications of drone technology in shipping and delivery is already in the works. Amazon was recently just given legal permission to use drones for carrying packages below 400 feet and weighing up to 1.5 pounds. In agriculture, drones will prove crucial for mapping 3D images of fields for soil analysis, as well as for spraying crops and determining their relative health and density, adds Scott Beale.

Scott Beale has been working in the aviation industry for more than 20 years, successfully growing businesses which he both acquired and founded. He has led various aviation firms in attaining revenue growth. More on Scott and his work here.

Electric planes are beginning to take to the sky

In a recent report from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), it was stated that aircraft have been responsible for about 8% of the entire greenhouse gas emission of the country’s transportation sector. This alarming development, coupled by a global demand for a greener aviation, is a huge reason why some manufacturers are beginning to consider building electric planes, says aviation professional Scott Beale.

OXBHLOUNVJEPTHOL6NAUEQ7RRE
Image source: latimes.com

A conventional jet airplane has an engine that draws in air through the front, a compressor for squeezing it, and fuel that’s sprayed in and lit, allowing for the burning of gases and the plane’s thrust. An electric plane, on the other hand, relies on batteries that provide power to an electric motor which spins the propeller.

However, while electric planes are definitely more efficient, they tend to be slower as the battery-reliant (often lithium-ion) process allows for far less thrust. In any case, there should be huge improvements in aviation technology in the coming decade, from reductions in operating costs and fossil fuel burning to emissions. In fact, NASA already has a prototype electric propulsion plane in the X-57.

ct-biz-electric-planes-market-getting-around-20180731
Image source: chicagotribune.com

There’s also the solar-powered Solar Impulse 2, which successfully circumnavigated the globe at average speeds of 47mph. Even Airbus has already revealed a two-seat electric plane that travels at speeds of 136mph.

In truth, the idea of using electric motors has been around since the World War II, when B-29 bombers used this technology to power the planes’ gun turrets. For now, a more concerted effort is needed to get greener and completely embrace electric aircraft. But their reign is imminent; not only a greener but a quieter way to fly should arrive sooner than projected, adds Scott Beale.

Aviation and aerospace professional Scott Beale is skilled in commercial sales and aviation products marketing, government contracting, and business startups. More on Mr. Beale and his work here.

Three Important Skills Pilots Develop From Flying

Three Important Skills Pilots Develop From Flying.png

More and more, businesses are understanding that some of the most valuable skills an employee can possess have very little to do with their job title or position. For instance, a potential recruit that knows how to use a certain type of software might also lack good people skills and they might fare more poorly than someone who lacks that same software knowledge but has great people skills. There are some careers and experiences that create higher-than-average success rates, both in business and in life. One of these is being a pilot. Here are three important skills pilots acquire from flying.

The ability to stay cool and calm under pressure

There are very few situations people find themselves in that are genuinely and legitimately life-or-death scenarios. Pilots are quite literally in a life-or-death situation every time they fly. When anything goes wrong, a good pilot realizes that panicking will not solve anything. Pilots have to be able to set their panic aside and think calmly and rationally to solve their problems.

Decision-making skills

Most of the time, people have to make decisions before they have a full and complete picture of the problem. Sometimes, people act too quickly or rashly and just make things worse. In other cases, they become paralyzed by fear of making the wrong decision and fail to act at all. Pilots have to do their best to assess the situation as best they can, then quickly run through any and all options available to them. They then must make a decision and act on it swiftly. In addition, they have to remain open to making course corrections as more information presents itself.

Humility

Many people think that confidence is the opposite of humility but it is not. It is possible to be confident and humble at the same time because the opposite of humility is arrogance, not confidence. You can be confident without being arrogant. The more skill a pilot gains, the more confident they become, but they are also keenly aware that their lives and those of any passengers are at the mercy of forces beyond their control. While there may be some pilots that are arrogant, it generally only takes a few life-threatening moments or incidents to instill some humility in them. Making it through those same moments will give them more confidence, but it will end up being tinged with humility at the same time.

This article was originally published on ScottBealeAviation.net.