The Hidden Meanings Inside Your Flight Number

Scott Beale Aviation The Hidden Meanings Inside Your Flight Number

Anyone who has ever taken a flight, international or domestic, knows that the number on your ticket is the key to everything. It tells you where to go, it helps you find your flight on the departures and arrivals board, and it is one of the main ways that you keep track of yourself and your luggage at the airport.

But have you ever wondered what that string of numbers and letters really mean, and what else they can do for you? Let’s take a look and find out.

The Significance of the Letters

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Reasons Why Drones Will Not Fly as Solo Fighter Aces Any Time Soon

Scott Beale Aviation Reasons Why Drones Will Not Fly as Solo Fighter Aces Any Time SoonVisions of a war fought with robotic soldiers and unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs), or a drone, has been for decades, deemed the fodder for science fiction lore. However, the military capabilities of drone aircraft have taken aviation warfare into a new Sci-Fi age. Does this mean the next great fighter ace will be a drone? Not necessarily.

Reaction Time

The landscape of ground warfare changes slowly. However, the environment surrounding air assaults can be altered in an instant. There is an inherent delay in communications, if ever so slight, between ground control and a drone. With reaction time being so vital real time success in air combat, humans are still critical to the success of these missions.

Continue reading “Reasons Why Drones Will Not Fly as Solo Fighter Aces Any Time Soon”

Feeling Tired After a Long Flight? Here’s Why

Scott Beale Aviation Feeling Tired After a Long Flight? Here's Why

People who fly will notice that once they land, they feel incredibly tired and lethargic. This happens even if the flight was long enough to have a nap. Have you ever wondered why flying makes you feel tired? There could be several factors at play.

Reduced Humidity
The air that is circulated into the airplane cabin is brought in from the outside atmosphere. The air that exists so high in the atmosphere is surprisingly void of moisture which means that the air you breathe during a long flight is dry. Dry air can cause you to develop dehydration. Dehydration causes lethargy and tiredness because it means that your blood volume has been reduced and isn’t providing necessary oxygen to your muscles and organs. The best way to combat this type of exhaustion is to drink plenty of water while in flight.

Continue reading “Feeling Tired After a Long Flight? Here’s Why”

Overcoming Your Fear of Flying by Scott Beale

The fear of flying is relatively common, but it can prevent people from traveling to see the world or for business. Overcoming that fear takes some time and effort, but it opens up a huge number of opportunities. It is worth the effort for most people, and there are a few different ways to get started.

Exposure & Professional Support 

To read the full blog and learn more about exposure and professional support, please visit my website: ScottBealeAviation.net.

Did You Know This About Air Force One?

Most Americans are familiar with Air Force One. It’s the big jet that the President uses for all his air travel. Many folks probably don’t give it much thought, preferring perhaps to focus on where the President is going and what he will be doing rather than the aircraft itself.

Air Force One, however, has a storied history and many interesting facts. Many of these points of interest were recently discussed in a Robb Report article. Here are a few of them:

Is there only one Air Force One?

At the present, two aircraft serve as Air Force One. Each one is a Boeing VC-25. In fact, Air Force One is a call-sign, not an aircraft. Any well-maintained aircraft can serve as Air Force One.

 

To read the full blog and learn more interesting facts about Air Force One, please visit my website: ScottBealeAviation.com

 

The Art Of Aviation: Fuel Economy

The rising energy consumption in the world today has countless negative implications for tomorrow’s generation. It’s a challenge for almost every industry to cut energy usage. The aviation industry is one of these industries. Luckily, steps are being taken to increase flight fuel efficiency through design and engineering.

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Image source: flightservicebureau.org

One of the concepts developed by aeronautical engineers is called the geared turbofan engine which is a fan-drive gear system engine. This piece of engineering marvel was designed a decade ago and has been installed in smaller, private jets. Some jet owners have observed as much as 15 percent less fuel consumed. And bigger geared turbofan engines for commercial airliners and freight planes are being developed and could be in the market within the next five years.

Even changing the materials used in creating aircraft components can help save fuel. Engineers have seen the effects of using composite ceramics in creating hotter combustion, which in turn leads to more fuel saved. Composite ceramics have a higher melting point and are as dependable as traditional alloys.

Composite ceramics can reduce the weight of engines by 30 percent. It can also bring down fuel usage as well.

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Image source: bigthink.com 

Scott Beale is a seasoned aviation professional. For more discussion on the aviation industry, visit this blog.

These heroic airline pilots are not to be forgotten

In aviation history, there are plenty of near-misses where the pilots did the right thing and were praised for their heroic deeds. Here are some names and stories that deserve a look back.

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Image source: Pixabay.com

Jakarta incident
On June 24, 1982, a British Airways flight from Heathrow to Auckland was passing over Jakarta, Indonesia, when it encountered volcanic ash from Mount Galunggung’s eruption, leading to failure of all four engines. The captain, Eric Moody, reassured passengers and calculated how far the plane might successfully glide before reaching sea level. The engines successfully restarted at about 13,500 feet.

Miracle on the Hudson
Chesley Sullenberger III was at the helm of US Airways Flight 1549 when it managed to land safely on the Hudson River after the aircraft was disabled by a flock of Canada geese. He told a publication that his only training for a water landing was going through a few paragraphs in a manual along with a brief classroom discussion.

British Airways Flight 5390
A badly fitted windscreen panel failed and sucked the captain, Tim Lancaster, halfway out of the cockpit on board a flight to Malaga with 81 passengers back in June 1990. His legs remained inside and tightly gripped by flight attendants, while co-pilot Alastair Atchison made an emergency descent amid an inability to hear air traffic control due to rushing air. The pilot landed safely in Southampton and was treated for a broken arm, frostbite, and shock.

Saving a superjumbo
Richard Champion de Crespigny, the captain of a Qantas flight on November 4, 2010, saw engine number 2 exploding over Indonesia, ruining a wing and causing a fuel tank fire. It forced the plane to make an emergency landing in Singapore, where miraculously no one was hurt except for four tires that blew during landing.

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Image source: Pixabay.com

Scott Beale has been working in the aviation industry for more than 20 years, successfully growing businesses, both of which he acquired and founded. Read more about his professional experience on this site.